Archive for the New Technology Category

Pavlov train’s the workplace

Posted in New Technology on April 25, 2012 by Andrew Woodruff

Every Tuesday, I get a reminder from my friends in accounting about filling out my timesheet. And again Wednesday. Once more Thursday. You get the point…

So, like so many social media experiments, why not try making it “fun”? I know, it seems hypocritical to have to incentivize your employees to get themselves paid, but a problem is a problem, no matter how puzzling. So, for the cost of a few cases of beer, you can boost moral, reward your employees, and make accounting happy in the process (HR, not so much).

Well, JWT Brazil has done just that, unlocking free beer for employees who complete timesheets.

Advertisements

Tupac at Coachella

Posted in New Technology on April 17, 2012 by Andrew Woodruff

On the last night of Coachella, Tupac joined Snoop and Dre on stage for one final performance. A life-size hologram projected him in full motion, complete with lyrics that synched with his movement. “Performed” Hail Mary and 2 of Amerikaz Most Wanted. Amazing use of technology, or a little too much? Would have been particularly eerie for Snoop, who performed Amerikaz Most Wanted with Pac live pack in the day.

The World’s Fastest Band

Posted in New Technology, Television Commercials on February 24, 2011 by Andrew Woodruff

Rocker, Flex and Groove are three members of the World’s Fastest Band. They are also key components of the new Puma running shoe. A great partnership.

The HP Slate – the non-iPad

Posted in New Technology on April 8, 2010 by Andrew Woodruff

Look, ours has a camera…

Apple’s first iPad commercial – remarkably unremarkable

Posted in New Technology, Television Commercials on March 9, 2010 by Andrew Woodruff

Apple, traditionally not known for pulling out stops and advertising during high-cost, high-profile events, has broken that pattern twice recently. First was it’s Super Bowl commercial. Now, the first spot for the “game-changing” iPad broke during last night’s Academy Awards. Only problem was, did not really show how it was going to change the game. It was nothing more than a commercial for a big iPhone, except that it cannot make calls. While it is an amazing piece of technology, I think they are stuck in the “well, we proved that we could make it, now what do we do with it?” phase. It is a whole lot of different things, an e-reader, a browser, a messaging machine…but what it is? I could not see myself writing this post on its touch-pad keyboard, or watching TV on it instead of my big screen. I am not going to make a presentation and edit documents on it.

Since the goal was to create demand for a totally new device, Apple and TBWA/Chiat Day stuck close to their proven playbook. They didn’t introduce any new characters or celebrity announcers. Instead, it was a glossy demo of all the neat stuff that the iPad does. It worked for the iPod and iPhone, eventually, so it will probably work for the iPad as well. However, would have liked to see them break from the norm to promote this device that obviously does just that.

Are HP webcams not designed to recognize black people?

Posted in New Technology on December 22, 2009 by Andrew Woodruff

This video makes a significantly compelling arguement that HP facial-tracking software has a very unfortunate bug: it doesn’t seem to track black faces. In the video, two co-workers show how the camera-tracking feature doesn’t work for the black man but operates just fine for the white woman. HP says it’s aware of the video and is working on gathering more info about the issue.

Winter gloves designed for texting and iPod use

Posted in New Technology on December 4, 2009 by Andrew Woodruff

They take a sarcastic tone in this spot, poking fun at a text and iPod addicted generation. However, having gone to school in Colorado, I can attest to trying to message or use my iPod on the walk to class and it being to cold to expose the skin of my hand that long. Great product, great timing, and a great understanding of our technology-addicted generation.